Hampshire castle under threat

Hurst Castle

Hurst Castle

by Chris Yandell 6:00am Saturday 9th March 2013 in News

MILLIONS of pounds may be needed to save one of Hampshire's best known landmarks from erosion, the Daily Echo can reveal.

Hurst Castle was built in the 16th century to counter the threat of a French attack and also helped combat the Nazis during the Second World War.

But the 470-year-old structure, near Keyhaven, is facing a new danger.

Huge waves are damaging part of the castle following a sudden shift in the pattern of coastal erosion, sparking fears that public access could be restricted unless urgent action is taken.

Emergency talks have taken place involving representatives from New Forest District Council and English Nature, which owns the fort.

David Jupp, chairman of Friends of Hurst Castle, said millions of pounds could be needed to be spent on protecting the structure.

“The pattern of coastal erosion has changed dramatically in the past six months,” he said. “Shingle separating the waves from the castle is being eroded away, threatening part of the ancient monument. Some of the stone cladding has fallen away and part of the foundations has been exposed.

“It’s very difficult to judge what will happen next but we could lose portions of the southern wall if nothing is done. That would call into question the safety of the structure and public access might be denied.”

Built in 1544, the castle occupies an exposed position at the end of Hurst Spit.

In the 1990s more than 600,000 tonnes of gravel were brought in to strengthen the Spit as part of a £5m sea defence scheme. The project was deemed so successful that plans to top-up the shingle after ten years were deferred.

Mr Jupp said huge lumps of granite now needed to be placed in front of the castle to break up the wave action.

An English Heritage spokesman said: “Coastal protection works were undertaken around 20 years ago and these had |been effective until relatively recently.

“However, this winter has seen an area of erosion develop along the east wing, where the level of shingle along the beach has dropped in some areas.

“This has resulted in part of the concrete foundations being exposed to high tides.”

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Comments

8:41am Sat 9 Mar 13 OSPREYSAINT says…

There is a lot of dredged material from the Southampton Water deepening, could that not be used to bolster the defences?

  • Score: 0

10:18am Sat 9 Mar 13 southy says…

OSPREYSAINT wrote…

There is a lot of dredged material from the Southampton Water deepening, could that not be used to bolster the defences?

No Osprey. Before the fort was built there it was an marsh Island the causeway between the island and mainland is man made and all ways been bolstered with more gravel, mud never been used because it would be wash away to quickly. To save this then they are going to need to put in sheet piles. But come later on when the wind returns to westerly then force of the waves will change also.

  • Score: 0

11:00am Sat 9 Mar 13 freefinker says…

southy wrote…

OSPREYSAINT wrote…

There is a lot of dredged material from the Southampton Water deepening, could that not be used to bolster the defences?
No Osprey. Before the fort was built there it was an marsh Island the causeway between the island and mainland is man made and all ways been bolstered with more gravel, mud never been used because it would be wash away to quickly. To save this then they are going to need to put in sheet piles. But come later on when the wind returns to westerly then force of the waves will change also.

.. absolute rubbish. The castle was built at the end of a natural pebble spit, formed since the end of the last Ice Age by the deposition of flint pebbles eroded from cliffs to the west and transported by the westerly currents. It is, in fact, a smaller version of Dorset’s Chesil Beach; totally natural and built by the same natural forces. And before you go on that you have seen dredged shingle being deposited on the spit, yes, that is true. A stabilisation scheme has been in operation for the last couple of decades. The reason, if you had actually bothered to check, is that modern sea defences to the west of the spit have severely restricted the supply of new pebbles as the cliffs are no longer naturally eroded to anywhere near the same extent as nature would have done. You just make it up as you go along, don’t you?

  • Score: 1

12:16pm Sat 9 Mar 13 southy says…

freefinker wrote…

southy wrote…

OSPREYSAINT wrote…

There is a lot of dredged material from the Southampton Water deepening, could that not be used to bolster the defences?
No Osprey. Before the fort was built there it was an marsh Island the causeway between the island and mainland is man made and all ways been bolstered with more gravel, mud never been used because it would be wash away to quickly. To save this then they are going to need to put in sheet piles. But come later on when the wind returns to westerly then force of the waves will change also.
.. absolute rubbish. The castle was built at the end of a natural pebble spit, formed since the end of the last Ice Age by the deposition of flint pebbles eroded from cliffs to the west and transported by the westerly currents. It is, in fact, a smaller version of Dorset’s Chesil Beach; totally natural and built by the same natural forces. And before you go on that you have seen dredged shingle being deposited on the spit, yes, that is true. A stabilisation scheme has been in operation for the last couple of decades. The reason, if you had actually bothered to check, is that modern sea defences to the west of the spit have severely restricted the supply of new pebbles as the cliffs are no longer naturally eroded to anywhere near the same extent as nature would have done. You just make it up as you go along, don’t you?

Don't talk rubbish Free a causeway had to be build, the force of some winter storms would of washed away any natural spit, that spit have had to be rebuilt at lest 3 times to my knowage in my life time. And if you read the history on the place you will read the cause way was built on a mud bank that showed at low water springs, underneath that spit is wooden piles. And if you knew any thing about chessil beach then you would know that bank was cause by deep water kelp attaching it self to stones and the current dragging in and the rest done by storm wave action, David Attenborough done a very good documentry on Chessil beach and how it was formed, he even explained where the stones started off and where the majority of the stones end up Dungeness Headland, stones that was wash down in the Ice Age by the river (that is now the english channel) that are being push back up the channel, and at the end of the last ice age this was all dry land

  • Score: 0

12:21pm Sat 9 Mar 13 Boatman says…

Nit picking perhaps but Hurst Castle is owned by English Heritage not English Nature

  • Score: 0

12:43pm Sat 9 Mar 13 freefinker says…

southy wrote…

freefinker wrote…

southy wrote…

OSPREYSAINT wrote…

There is a lot of dredged material from the Southampton Water deepening, could that not be used to bolster the defences?
No Osprey. Before the fort was built there it was an marsh Island the causeway between the island and mainland is man made and all ways been bolstered with more gravel, mud never been used because it would be wash away to quickly. To save this then they are going to need to put in sheet piles. But come later on when the wind returns to westerly then force of the waves will change also.
.. absolute rubbish. The castle was built at the end of a natural pebble spit, formed since the end of the last Ice Age by the deposition of flint pebbles eroded from cliffs to the west and transported by the westerly currents. It is, in fact, a smaller version of Dorset’s Chesil Beach; totally natural and built by the same natural forces. And before you go on that you have seen dredged shingle being deposited on the spit, yes, that is true. A stabilisation scheme has been in operation for the last couple of decades. The reason, if you had actually bothered to check, is that modern sea defences to the west of the spit have severely restricted the supply of new pebbles as the cliffs are no longer naturally eroded to anywhere near the same extent as nature would have done. You just make it up as you go along, don’t you?
Don't talk rubbish Free a causeway had to be build, the force of some winter storms would of washed away any natural spit, that spit have had to be rebuilt at lest 3 times to my knowage in my life time. And if you read the history on the place you will read the cause way was built on a mud bank that showed at low water springs, underneath that spit is wooden piles. And if you knew any thing about chessil beach then you would know that bank was cause by deep water kelp attaching it self to stones and the current dragging in and the rest done by storm wave action, David Attenborough done a very good documentry on Chessil beach and how it was formed, he even explained where the stones started off and where the majority of the stones end up Dungeness Headland, stones that was wash down in the Ice Age by the river (that is now the english channel) that are being push back up the channel, and at the end of the last ice age this was all dry land

.. boll0cks. If you don't understand longshore drift then you will never understand the coasts of Dorset, Hampshire, Sussex and Kent. see http://www.southampt on.ac.uk/~imw/Hurst- Castle-Spit.htm Now take a bit of time and read the academic link I have posted. Especially this bit: - “Hurst Spit is a barrier beach, the southeastern aggradation feature to which the subangular flint beach shingle of Christchurch Bay has been moved progressively eastward by the longshore drift (compare to the Chesil Beach). This transport from west to east is the result of the prevailing southwesterly winds. The spit represents the destination for subangular flint gravel travelling by long-shore drift from the supply cliffs of Highcliffe, Barton-on-Sea and Hordle Cliff. “Gravel has always been lost from the end of the spit and the whole spit has moved landwards by a "rollover" process. It has survived more or less unbroken for thousands of years, but not in the same place . Washover and temporary breaching has occurred recently because the delayed effects of the sea-defence works in Christchurch Bay finally stopped any significant natural transport of shingle to the beach.” Note the “thousands of years”. Now are you going to argue with this expert? Or just spout your usual made up rubbish. Have added this to my list of southy’s bloomers.

  • Score: 0

2:51pm Sat 9 Mar 13 stay local says…

One again the incompetence of Southy is there for all to see. Why don't you go to http://www.southampt on.ac.uk/~imw/Hurst- Castle-Spit.htm. But make sure you read ALL the detail as it clearly states the natural spit has recently had to be reinforced due to coastal protection work further along the coast which has reduced the amount of material that built up the spit. It is fascinating how Southy can be so constant in his information, the only problem is that he is consistently wrong.

  • Score: 0

3:49pm Sat 9 Mar 13 Ginger_cyclist says…

Southy is totally wrong here, I even had to go on a school trip to Hurst spit AND the coastal cliffs and you could see exactly how the spit had got there which is as freefinker says, longshore drift.

  • Score: 0

6:59pm Sat 9 Mar 13 J.P.M says…

I like southy's story better though - all that hard work to build the spit. I suppose there was worker exploitation and underhand employment practices.

  • Score: 0

8:55pm Sat 9 Mar 13 OSPREYSAINT says…

J.P.M wrote…

I like southy's story better though - all that hard work to build the spit. I suppose there was worker exploitation and underhand employment practices.

I didn't predict a riot! I am not sure the stuff being dredged up is mud, I thought it was more substantial material than that?

  • Score: 0

9:00pm Sat 9 Mar 13 OSPREYSAINT says…

I know where there are some large blocks of stone that don't seem to be much use, in Wiltshire.

  • Score: 0

9:36pm Sat 9 Mar 13 freefinker says…

J.P.M wrote…

I like southy's story better though - all that hard work to build the spit. I suppose there was worker exploitation and underhand employment practices.

.. lol. I do love your contributions.

  • Score: 0

9:37am Sun 10 Mar 13 forest hump says…

Ginger_cyclist wrote…

Southy is totally wrong here, I even had to go on a school trip to Hurst spit AND the coastal cliffs and you could see exactly how the spit had got there which is as freefinker says, longshore drift.

The Americas used to be connected to Europe/ Africa. Now that's what I call longshore drift!!!

  • Score: 0

10:00am Sun 10 Mar 13 freefinker says…

forest hump wrote…

Ginger_cyclist wrote…

Southy is totally wrong here, I even had to go on a school trip to Hurst spit AND the coastal cliffs and you could see exactly how the spit had got there which is as freefinker says, longshore drift.
The Americas used to be connected to Europe/ Africa. Now that's what I call longshore drift!!!

That's 'Continental Drift', now known as Plate Tectonics. Quite different.

  • Score: 0

11:04am Sun 10 Mar 13 southy says…

freefinker wrote…

southy wrote…

freefinker wrote…

southy wrote…

OSPREYSAINT wrote…

There is a lot of dredged material from the Southampton Water deepening, could that not be used to bolster the defences?
No Osprey. Before the fort was built there it was an marsh Island the causeway between the island and mainland is man made and all ways been bolstered with more gravel, mud never been used because it would be wash away to quickly. To save this then they are going to need to put in sheet piles. But come later on when the wind returns to westerly then force of the waves will change also.
.. absolute rubbish. The castle was built at the end of a natural pebble spit, formed since the end of the last Ice Age by the deposition of flint pebbles eroded from cliffs to the west and transported by the westerly currents. It is, in fact, a smaller version of Dorset’s Chesil Beach; totally natural and built by the same natural forces. And before you go on that you have seen dredged shingle being deposited on the spit, yes, that is true. A stabilisation scheme has been in operation for the last couple of decades. The reason, if you had actually bothered to check, is that modern sea defences to the west of the spit have severely restricted the supply of new pebbles as the cliffs are no longer naturally eroded to anywhere near the same extent as nature would have done. You just make it up as you go along, don’t you?
Don't talk rubbish Free a causeway had to be build, the force of some winter storms would of washed away any natural spit, that spit have had to be rebuilt at lest 3 times to my knowage in my life time. And if you read the history on the place you will read the cause way was built on a mud bank that showed at low water springs, underneath that spit is wooden piles. And if you knew any thing about chessil beach then you would know that bank was cause by deep water kelp attaching it self to stones and the current dragging in and the rest done by storm wave action, David Attenborough done a very good documentry on Chessil beach and how it was formed, he even explained where the stones started off and where the majority of the stones end up Dungeness Headland, stones that was wash down in the Ice Age by the river (that is now the english channel) that are being push back up the channel, and at the end of the last ice age this was all dry land
.. boll0cks. If you don't understand longshore drift then you will never understand the coasts of Dorset, Hampshire, Sussex and Kent. see http://www.southampt on.ac.uk/~imw/Hurst- Castle-Spit.htm Now take a bit of time and read the academic link I have posted. Especially this bit: - “Hurst Spit is a barrier beach, the southeastern aggradation feature to which the subangular flint beach shingle of Christchurch Bay has been moved progressively eastward by the longshore drift (compare to the Chesil Beach). This transport from west to east is the result of the prevailing southwesterly winds. The spit represents the destination for subangular flint gravel travelling by long-shore drift from the supply cliffs of Highcliffe, Barton-on-Sea and Hordle Cliff. “Gravel has always been lost from the end of the spit and the whole spit has moved landwards by a "rollover" process. It has survived more or less unbroken for thousands of years, but not in the same place . Washover and temporary breaching has occurred recently because the delayed effects of the sea-defence works in Christchurch Bay finally stopped any significant natural transport of shingle to the beach.” Note the “thousands of years”. Now are you going to argue with this expert? Or just spout your usual made up rubbish. Have added this to my list of southy’s bloomers.

No going to Free because you can not get long shore drift going against the current direction, If the the coast was dead streight line then that current would be west to east right the way along channel, but because of headlands and points ect, it causes eddys in the flow of the current and its because of these eddys the current runs east to west close inshore. The flint stones right along the South Coast are all the same, and come from inland from the last ice age, when the English channel was just a river washing all these flints down the river and depositing them in what is now the Celtic sea and English Channel meets, then came sea level rises flooding the english channel Kelt begins to grow on the flint stones deposits and acts like a sail in the water dragging the stone back up the English channel some get cought in the eddys then get push up on the shore at placles like Christchurch bay and along New milton beach and Selsea Bill but most will end up at Dungeness headland. They are all the same type of flint. This as been filmed and is known what is happening all the way along the English cannel and it is speed currents that will decide the size of the stone. And if you look at the stone size its larger at the Milford on sea end than it is at the Mudeford end, that is telling you which way the current is running east to west. Also you look at local history to each of these areas along that beach, 400 years ago it was a sandy beach mainly with a few stones, and thats because the area is made up from a few types of soft stone like sandstone, these stones was brough in close and trap by the eddy current though a storm surge water in the 1700's in the English Channel (some thing like on the scale that the North sea saw in the 1950's). In the 80's Hurst spit was flatten, between the bridge and the fort, stones was push up right onto the Keyheaven marsh road (saltgrass lane) you could see the wooden piles sticking up that was buried under the stones, from the days when they built this spit, even if you read about the place there was a time in its early days the fort could only be reach by boat. You can add what ever you like as long you don't minded to be reminded yet again, time will prove me right its happen to many times with you.

  • Score: 0

11:30am Sun 10 Mar 13 freefinker says…

southy wrote…

freefinker wrote…

southy wrote…

freefinker wrote…

southy wrote…

OSPREYSAINT wrote…

There is a lot of dredged material from the Southampton Water deepening, could that not be used to bolster the defences?
No Osprey. Before the fort was built there it was an marsh Island the causeway between the island and mainland is man made and all ways been bolstered with more gravel, mud never been used because it would be wash away to quickly. To save this then they are going to need to put in sheet piles. But come later on when the wind returns to westerly then force of the waves will change also.
.. absolute rubbish. The castle was built at the end of a natural pebble spit, formed since the end of the last Ice Age by the deposition of flint pebbles eroded from cliffs to the west and transported by the westerly currents. It is, in fact, a smaller version of Dorset’s Chesil Beach; totally natural and built by the same natural forces. And before you go on that you have seen dredged shingle being deposited on the spit, yes, that is true. A stabilisation scheme has been in operation for the last couple of decades. The reason, if you had actually bothered to check, is that modern sea defences to the west of the spit have severely restricted the supply of new pebbles as the cliffs are no longer naturally eroded to anywhere near the same extent as nature would have done. You just make it up as you go along, don’t you?
Don't talk rubbish Free a causeway had to be build, the force of some winter storms would of washed away any natural spit, that spit have had to be rebuilt at lest 3 times to my knowage in my life time. And if you read the history on the place you will read the cause way was built on a mud bank that showed at low water springs, underneath that spit is wooden piles. And if you knew any thing about chessil beach then you would know that bank was cause by deep water kelp attaching it self to stones and the current dragging in and the rest done by storm wave action, David Attenborough done a very good documentry on Chessil beach and how it was formed, he even explained where the stones started off and where the majority of the stones end up Dungeness Headland, stones that was wash down in the Ice Age by the river (that is now the english channel) that are being push back up the channel, and at the end of the last ice age this was all dry land
.. boll0cks. If you don't understand longshore drift then you will never understand the coasts of Dorset, Hampshire, Sussex and Kent. see http://www.southampt on.ac.uk/~imw/Hurst- Castle-Spit.htm Now take a bit of time and read the academic link I have posted. Especially this bit: - “Hurst Spit is a barrier beach, the southeastern aggradation feature to which the subangular flint beach shingle of Christchurch Bay has been moved progressively eastward by the longshore drift (compare to the Chesil Beach). This transport from west to east is the result of the prevailing southwesterly winds. The spit represents the destination for subangular flint gravel travelling by long-shore drift from the supply cliffs of Highcliffe, Barton-on-Sea and Hordle Cliff. “Gravel has always been lost from the end of the spit and the whole spit has moved landwards by a "rollover" process. It has survived more or less unbroken for thousands of years, but not in the same place . Washover and temporary breaching has occurred recently because the delayed effects of the sea-defence works in Christchurch Bay finally stopped any significant natural transport of shingle to the beach.” Note the “thousands of years”. Now are you going to argue with this expert? Or just spout your usual made up rubbish. Have added this to my list of southy’s bloomers.
No going to Free because you can not get long shore drift going against the current direction, If the the coast was dead streight line then that current would be west to east right the way along channel, but because of headlands and points ect, it causes eddys in the flow of the current and its because of these eddys the current runs east to west close inshore. The flint stones right along the South Coast are all the same, and come from inland from the last ice age, when the English channel was just a river washing all these flints down the river and depositing them in what is now the Celtic sea and English Channel meets, then came sea level rises flooding the english channel Kelt begins to grow on the flint stones deposits and acts like a sail in the water dragging the stone back up the English channel some get cought in the eddys then get push up on the shore at placles like Christchurch bay and along New milton beach and Selsea Bill but most will end up at Dungeness headland. They are all the same type of flint. This as been filmed and is known what is happening all the way along the English cannel and it is speed currents that will decide the size of the stone. And if you look at the stone size its larger at the Milford on sea end than it is at the Mudeford end, that is telling you which way the current is running east to west. Also you look at local history to each of these areas along that beach, 400 years ago it was a sandy beach mainly with a few stones, and thats because the area is made up from a few types of soft stone like sandstone, these stones was brough in close and trap by the eddy current though a storm surge water in the 1700's in the English Channel (some thing like on the scale that the North sea saw in the 1950's). In the 80's Hurst spit was flatten, between the bridge and the fort, stones was push up right onto the Keyheaven marsh road (saltgrass lane) you could see the wooden piles sticking up that was buried under the stones, from the days when they built this spit, even if you read about the place there was a time in its early days the fort could only be reach by boat. You can add what ever you like as long you don't minded to be reminded yet again, time will prove me right its happen to many times with you.

.. absolute nonsense. The most telling bit is at the very beginning; 'No going to', says southy. That's right, southy is NOT going to read the work of an expert academic from Southampton University who has studied the Geology of the Wessex Coast all his working life. Oh no, because southy knows best. He is always right and it’s the rest of the world that has it wrong. Well southy, I did read through your screed. I can understand where you got many of the snippets from but in each case you are clearly showing you did not understand fully the original TV programme, newspaper article, scientific paper, etc. and have totally got the wrong end of the stick. You then assemble these small bits of misinformation and misunderstandings into a hopelessly wrong interpretation of Hurst Spit in particular and post ice age changes to coastal Britain in general. You are scientifically illiterate, and as usual you are making a fool of yourself.

  • Score: 0

1:49pm Sun 10 Mar 13 southy says…

freefinker its not nonsense and your academic as been told by colleages that he is wrong, he do not take into a account of deep water sea currents or inshore shallow currents. which as a big effect on what size stones it can carry and how they are moved around on the sea bed. Do you know how to read a ocean/sea chart and a tide books. If you do then you will off notice that there is a natural ridge that runs right across Christchurch Bay it runs from the Needles to Peveril Point, Swanage, less than 50,000 years ago this ridge was above water and miles inland, now days that ridge is still there and acts like a barrier against flint stones, the channel side of ridge is flint stones building up, on the landward side its sand. every so often theres a storm going in the right direction that causes a storm surge, when this happens it pushes loads of these flint stones over the ridge, then move towards the needles, it then swirls round (some passes though into the Solent that causes the 2 gravel banks that show up at low water springs) the rest follows the coast to wards mudeford, as the current decreases it stops moving the larger stones while the smaller ones carry on towards Mudeford, Your not talking about a great deal in size difference only about 2mm from one end to the other, and thats because of the normal speed of the sea current that runs east to west along that beach. This is also want the ex Don of the oceanography university agrees with also and you can go and ask Her she only lives around the corner, she had been working all her life on marine matters, not jut though the uni but also with registered fishermen and the both Navys. Those flint stones are not from the local area they have been bought in by time and natural means, the natural beach along there is a sand, and its only right storms that bring those flint stones in naturally, the rest was bought in by man. If left to nature Hurst spit would not be there, it would off been wash away years ago, there would be a lot less there than there would be at Calshot spit and that has a river to keep it shape

  • Score: 0

1:57pm Sun 10 Mar 13 southy says…

Also there are accounts of barges bringing up flint from Rye to make Hurst spit

  • Score: 0

2:13pm Sun 10 Mar 13 stay local says…

southy wrote…

freefinker its not nonsense and your academic as been told by colleages that he is wrong, he do not take into a account of deep water sea currents or inshore shallow currents. which as a big effect on what size stones it can carry and how they are moved around on the sea bed. Do you know how to read a ocean/sea chart and a tide books. If you do then you will off notice that there is a natural ridge that runs right across Christchurch Bay it runs from the Needles to Peveril Point, Swanage, less than 50,000 years ago this ridge was above water and miles inland, now days that ridge is still there and acts like a barrier against flint stones, the channel side of ridge is flint stones building up, on the landward side its sand. every so often theres a storm going in the right direction that causes a storm surge, when this happens it pushes loads of these flint stones over the ridge, then move towards the needles, it then swirls round (some passes though into the Solent that causes the 2 gravel banks that show up at low water springs) the rest follows the coast to wards mudeford, as the current decreases it stops moving the larger stones while the smaller ones carry on towards Mudeford, Your not talking about a great deal in size difference only about 2mm from one end to the other, and thats because of the normal speed of the sea current that runs east to west along that beach. This is also want the ex Don of the oceanography university agrees with also and you can go and ask Her she only lives around the corner, she had been working all her life on marine matters, not jut though the uni but also with registered fishermen and the both Navys. Those flint stones are not from the local area they have been bought in by time and natural means, the natural beach along there is a sand, and its only right storms that bring those flint stones in naturally, the rest was bought in by man. If left to nature Hurst spit would not be there, it would off been wash away years ago, there would be a lot less there than there would be at Calshot spit and that has a river to keep it shape

Southy we have already had the benefit of you dubious knowledge with the outlandish claims of slippage several miles from a dredging site but with a very local piece of subsidence. the as now you refused to take into account detailed multi-agency and university reports in favour of you own cuckoo brain ideas. If as you claim there is no long shore drift capable of creating Hurst spit how do you account for Chesil beach, sandbanks,needs ore point, Calshot spit, Haslar, Langstone spit,Etc all show the same basic structure. All are effected by a change in the source material. If you would like to go to the library and look at a map for the areas you can see at least 55 groynes to the West of Hurst spit holding back the material that is being moved along the beach. when reduce the material being provided to Hurst spit to allow it to regenerate then it will need support to maintain it. Your logic is faulty , your knowledge is limited , your research is poor to non existent and your ability to admit you are wrong is completely missing. These are not good characteristics for some one who is actively seeking political office!

  • Score: 0

7:07pm Sun 10 Mar 13 forest hump says…

freefinker wrote…

forest hump wrote…

Ginger_cyclist wrote…

Southy is totally wrong here, I even had to go on a school trip to Hurst spit AND the coastal cliffs and you could see exactly how the spit had got there which is as freefinker says, longshore drift.
The Americas used to be connected to Europe/ Africa. Now that's what I call longshore drift!!!
That's 'Continental Drift', now known as Plate Tectonics. Quite different.

I was being sarcastic ginge. Obviously straight over the swede

  • Score: 0

7:15pm Sun 10 Mar 13 X Old Bill says…

I spotted this item and thought: 'I bet Southy has some words of unwisdom on this topic' And I was right! Wait for it, he hasn't mentioned the Cotentin Peninsula yet. I have walked both Hurst spit and Chesil beach and there are striking similarities in shape, grading and structure; Just the size that is different, and the level of exhaustion at the other end.

  • Score: 0

7:24pm Sun 10 Mar 13 forest hump says…

stay local wrote…

southy wrote…

freefinker its not nonsense and your academic as been told by colleages that he is wrong, he do not take into a account of deep water sea currents or inshore shallow currents. which as a big effect on what size stones it can carry and how they are moved around on the sea bed. Do you know how to read a ocean/sea chart and a tide books. If you do then you will off notice that there is a natural ridge that runs right across Christchurch Bay it runs from the Needles to Peveril Point, Swanage, less than 50,000 years ago this ridge was above water and miles inland, now days that ridge is still there and acts like a barrier against flint stones, the channel side of ridge is flint stones building up, on the landward side its sand. every so often theres a storm going in the right direction that causes a storm surge, when this happens it pushes loads of these flint stones over the ridge, then move towards the needles, it then swirls round (some passes though into the Solent that causes the 2 gravel banks that show up at low water springs) the rest follows the coast to wards mudeford, as the current decreases it stops moving the larger stones while the smaller ones carry on towards Mudeford, Your not talking about a great deal in size difference only about 2mm from one end to the other, and thats because of the normal speed of the sea current that runs east to west along that beach. This is also want the ex Don of the oceanography university agrees with also and you can go and ask Her she only lives around the corner, she had been working all her life on marine matters, not jut though the uni but also with registered fishermen and the both Navys. Those flint stones are not from the local area they have been bought in by time and natural means, the natural beach along there is a sand, and its only right storms that bring those flint stones in naturally, the rest was bought in by man. If left to nature Hurst spit would not be there, it would off been wash away years ago, there would be a lot less there than there would be at Calshot spit and that has a river to keep it shape
Southy we have already had the benefit of you dubious knowledge with the outlandish claims of slippage several miles from a dredging site but with a very local piece of subsidence. the as now you refused to take into account detailed multi-agency and university reports in favour of you own cuckoo brain ideas. If as you claim there is no long shore drift capable of creating Hurst spit how do you account for Chesil beach, sandbanks,needs ore point, Calshot spit, Haslar, Langstone spit,Etc all show the same basic structure. All are effected by a change in the source material. If you would like to go to the library and look at a map for the areas you can see at least 55 groynes to the West of Hurst spit holding back the material that is being moved along the beach. when reduce the material being provided to Hurst spit to allow it to regenerate then it will need support to maintain it. Your logic is faulty , your knowledge is limited , your research is poor to non existent and your ability to admit you are wrong is completely missing. These are not good characteristics for some one who is actively seeking political office!

Many (hundreds maybe!) times Mr Southy has spouted absolute drivel. I doubt anyone's integrity who cannot demonstrate a basic understanding of the written word. Motivation is either a sick sense of antagonising others or just a blithering, inconsistent fool. Either way, best to ignore

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9:06am Mon 11 Mar 13 freefinker says…

southy wrote…

freefinker its not nonsense and your academic as been told by colleages that he is wrong, he do not take into a account of deep water sea currents or inshore shallow currents. which as a big effect on what size stones it can carry and how they are moved around on the sea bed. Do you know how to read a ocean/sea chart and a tide books. If you do then you will off notice that there is a natural ridge that runs right across Christchurch Bay it runs from the Needles to Peveril Point, Swanage, less than 50,000 years ago this ridge was above water and miles inland, now days that ridge is still there and acts like a barrier against flint stones, the channel side of ridge is flint stones building up, on the landward side its sand. every so often theres a storm going in the right direction that causes a storm surge, when this happens it pushes loads of these flint stones over the ridge, then move towards the needles, it then swirls round (some passes though into the Solent that causes the 2 gravel banks that show up at low water springs) the rest follows the coast to wards mudeford, as the current decreases it stops moving the larger stones while the smaller ones carry on towards Mudeford, Your not talking about a great deal in size difference only about 2mm from one end to the other, and thats because of the normal speed of the sea current that runs east to west along that beach. This is also want the ex Don of the oceanography university agrees with also and you can go and ask Her she only lives around the corner, she had been working all her life on marine matters, not jut though the uni but also with registered fishermen and the both Navys. Those flint stones are not from the local area they have been bought in by time and natural means, the natural beach along there is a sand, and its only right storms that bring those flint stones in naturally, the rest was bought in by man. If left to nature Hurst spit would not be there, it would off been wash away years ago, there would be a lot less there than there would be at Calshot spit and that has a river to keep it shape

.. yet more snippets of misinformation with the very rare fact thrown in. Now come on; tell us who this 'ex Don' who 'only lives around the corner' actually is. Bet you can't.

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9:15am Mon 11 Mar 13 freefinker says…

X Old Bill wrote…

I spotted this item and thought: 'I bet Southy has some words of unwisdom on this topic' And I was right! Wait for it, he hasn't mentioned the Cotentin Peninsula yet. I have walked both Hurst spit and Chesil beach and there are striking similarities in shape, grading and structure; Just the size that is different, and the level of exhaustion at the other end.

.. yep, you could almost guarantee on reading the headline that southy would be offering his 'wisdom' on the subject. My thought processes were exactly the same. And neither of us were disappointed.

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